Kindergarten – 2nd Grade

Excellent education in an Islamic environment.


There are a variety of learning styles found in the kindergarten through second grade classrooms. For many students, this is a time of many changes as it may be their first experience spending a significant time away from immediate family members for an extended period. At Avicenna Academy, educators strive to support the development of students in all areas; social, emotional, cognitive, and physical. The purpose of promoting competencies in all these areas is to prepare students to develop into lifelong learners who seek to continue discovering the world around them. Students in kindergarten through second grade are provided with differentiated learning in all areas of the curriculum to minimize achievement gaps and provide experiences of academic success. The basis of our scope and sequence here at Avicenna is based on the Pearson curriculum.

Reading

Kindergarteners will understand and apply knowledge of print concepts, phonics, phonemic awareness, vocabulary, and comprehension as a foundation for developing reading skills

First Graders and Second Grade will develop an understanding of the five components of reading to build foundational reading skills.

Kindergarten through second grade will orally read grade-level appropriate or higher text smoothly and accurately, with expression that connotes comprehension at the independent level.

Kindergarteners will actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

First Graders, with support, will read and comprehend nonfiction that is grade-level appropriate.

Second graders will read and comprehend a variety of nonfiction within a range of complexity appropriate for grade-level.

Kindergarteners will write for specific purposes and audiences.

First graders will write routinely over brief time frames and for a variety of purposes and audiences.

Second graders will write routinely over brief time frames and for a variety of tasks, purposes, and audience; apply reading standards to write in response to literature and nonfiction text.

Kindergarteners will listen actively and communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

First and second graders will listen actively and adjust the use of spoken language to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

Math

Kindergarteners will learn to count to at least 100 by ones and tens and count on by one from any number. During this year, students in kindergarten will also learn to write whole numbers 0 – 20, count up to 20 objects arranged in a line or array, count up to 10 objects in a scattered arrangement, recognize sets of 1 to 1 objects in a patterned arrangement, compare the values of two numbers from 1 to 20, identify groups of objects that are greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, separate sets of ten or fewer objects into equal groups, and develop initial understanding of place value and the base 10 number system.

In first grade, students will learn how to count to at least 120 by ones, fives, and tens from any given number, match the ordinal numbers first, second, third, etc, with an ordered set up to 10 items, find mentally 10 more or 10 less than a given 2-digit number without having to count, use place value understanding to compare two 2-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, understand that 10 can be thought of as a group of ten ones, and show equivalent forms of whole numbers as groups of tens and ones.

In second grade, students will be able to count by ones, twos, five, tens, and hundreds up to at least 1,000 from any given number, match the ordinal numbers first, second, third, etc., with an ordered set up to 30 items, read and write whole numbers up to 1,000 using words, models, standard form and expanded form, plot and compare whole numbers up to 1,000 on a number line, use place value understanding to compare two three-digit numbers, determine whether a group of objects up to 20 has an odd or even number of members, and understand that three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones.

In kindergarten, students will use objects, drawings, and mental images to represent addition and subtraction within 10, solve real-world problems that involve addition and subtraction within 10, use objects and drawings to decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number for any number from 1 to 9, and create, extended and give an appropriate rule for simple repeating and growing patterns with numbers and shapes

First graders will demonstrate fluency with addition facts and corresponding subtractions facts using a variety of strategies, add within 100, solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction within 20, create a real-world problem to represent a given equation involving addition and subtraction within 20, understand the meaning of the equal sign and determine if the equations are true or false, create, extend, and give an appropriate rule for number patterns using addition within 100.

In second grade, students will add and subtract fluently within 100, add and subtract within 1000, solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction within 100, use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in an array, understand the commutative and associative properties, and create, extend and give an appropriate rule for number patterns using addition and subtraction within 1000.

Kindergarteners will describe the position of objects and geometric shapes in space, compare two- and three-dimensional shapes in different sizes and orientations, model shapes in the world by composing shapes from objects, and compose simple geometric shapes to form larger shapes.

In first grade, students will identify objects as two- or three-dimensional, distinguish between defining attributes of two- and three-dimensional attributes, and partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal parts using vocabulary such as halves, fourths, and quarters.

Second graders will identify, describe, and classify two- and three-dimensional shapes, create squares, triangles, cubes, and right rectangular prisms, investigate and predict the result of composing and decomposing two- and three-dimensional shapes, and partition rectangles into rows and columns of the same size using vocabulary such as two halves, three thirds, four fourths.

Kindergarteners will make direct comparisons of length, capacity, weight, and temperature of objects, recognize which objects are shorter or longer, lighter or heavier, warmer or cooler. Students will also begin to understand the concepts of times such as morning, afternoon, evening, today, yesterday, tomorrow, day, week, month and year.

In first grade, students will use direct comparison to compare and order objects according to length, area, capacity, weight, and temperature. Students will tell and write time to the nearest half-hour and relate time to events using analog clocks. In first grade students begin to identify and find the value of pennies, nickels, and dimes.

Second graders will be able to describe the relationship among inch, foot, and yard. Students will describe the relationship between centimeter and meter. In second grade students will estimate and measure the length of an object by selecting and using tools such as rulers, yardsticks, metersticks, and measuring tapes, understand that measurement is a constant regardless of units used, estimate and measure volume using cups and pints, tell time to the nearest five minutes using analog clocks, and find the value of collections of pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, and dollars.

Kindergarteners will identify, sort, and classify objects by size, number, and other attributes. Students objects that do not belong to a particular group and explain the reasoning used.

First graders will organize and interpret data with up to three choices and ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each choice, and how many more or less in one choice compared to another.

Second graders will be able to draw a picture graph to represent a data set with up to four choices. Students in this grade will be able to solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in the graphs.

Kindergarten through second grade will begin to explore the scientific method and develop essential skills such as inquiry, observation and data collections. Students will investigate and research information involving our solar system, the weather, and the Earth’s systems and structures.

Students will engage in investigation in life sciences and engineering as lessons present real-world relevance that requires the development of solid problem-solving skills.

In kindergarten through second grade, students explore communities both past and present and understand sequencing of events by beginning to create timelines. Additionally, students in kindergarten through second grade are introduced to government and the roles of citizens. Students also are introduced to geography and basic economics in the form of needs and wants.